Wacaco Roast Reviews - Loam Coffee – Mystery DH

Roast Reviews brought to you by coffee connoisseurs Beth & George

As soon as we saw the tagline, “Coffee was meant to be enjoyed outside,” we knew we’d like Loam Coffee of Portland, Oregon. Loam is named after the particular type of fertile soil found in the Pacific Northwest, where the roasters enjoy “‘epic’ trail conditions” as mountain bikers when they’re not busy at company HQ. Mountain biking isn’t just a casual hobby for the Loam team – it’s a way of life that goes hand-in-hand with their need for coffee sustenance. In need of on-the-go brewing methods, Nanopresso is an obvious choice for Loam lovers, too.

Mystery DH (Guatemala Cubulco)

Origin: A blend of Catuai, Pache-San Ramon, Sarchimor, Bourbon, and Caturra variety Arabic beans. Coffee beans grown on five farms in the Cubulca region of Guatemala; roasted and packed in Portland, Oregon.

First Impressions

Our Mystery DH tasting journey took us down vastly different paths at the onset. Beth followed her nose through a springy garden of blooming lilacs, past tropical sugarcane fields, before ending up at city park food stand selling roasted nuts. After detecting a hint of leather and bitter fruit that he couldn’t quite elaborate on, George found himself in a bakery where chocolate chip cookies had just been pulled out of the oven. We found each other again when George poured a “textbook perfect” shot of espresso, and we could only stare at it in awe. Speaking in reverent hushed tones, we agreed sipping through the crema would feel like breaking into the yolk of a masterfully made egg “over easy.”

Tasting Notes

Often, we sound like amateur sommeliers throwing around words like “complex” and “acidity” to describe espresso. Once we start making up words and phrases, you may wonder if we’ve actually had wine instead, and perhaps a bit too much? Mystery DH brought out our best (worst) terminology, like “roastiness” and “something Italian!” Beth waxed poetic on the close resemblance of her espresso to an acidic wine, one that could be taken up a notch with a lemon peel garnish. George said he’d be happy to enjoy it for dessert, in place of cookies. He promptly prepared himself another perfect shot, then poured it over ice.

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